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Blood Orange Marmalade | Put ‘Em Up! Fruit Recipe

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A little bit of sunshine in a jar. This Blood Orange Marmalade has a sweet, yet subtly tart citrus flavor that makes you think of a sunny day! 

\Blood Orange Marmalade

Four years ago, I had an epiphany moment, when I went to the grocery store for apples. Yes, apples. I was sorting through the bins looking for the best ones, when I noticed how they all had a white sheen to them. Wax. Chemicals. Whatever.

Why had I never noticed that before?

It was really gross and in no time flat I had walked away from the produce aisle and located my nearest Farmer’s Market where I became a weekly patron and have been since. I love the fresh vegetables and fruits, the vibrant colors, the full flavors.

Blood Orange Marmalade

However, it wasn’t long after, I wised up and decided it was time to start a more sustainable situation – my own vegetable and fruit garden where I controlled what was going on.

It took a few years to get it right and to get stuff to really keep growing and coming back, but now it is thriving and I look forward to things coming back each year. I look forward to my time in the garden in the spring planting and pruning.

Suddenly, last summer, my garden was literally overflowing with vegetables and fruits. I had so many tomatoes I didn’t know what to do with them. And cucumbers. And beans. And strawberries. And watermelon.

I couldn’t waste them, so I knew it was time to take a walk on the wild side and learn how to can and preserve them. There was one book I had heard only wonderful things about, Put ’em Up! by Sherri Brooks Vinton. I learned a lot. I love that book. And I still refer to it often.

Blood Orange Marmalade

Put 'em Up! FruitWhen I found out Sherri had released her second book, Put ’em Up! Fruit: A Preserving Guide & Cookbook: Creative Ways to Put ’em Up, Tasty Ways to Use ’em Up and I was offered the chance to check it out and review it for her blog tour, I absolutely jumped on the chance. Click here to check out the video trailer for the book and to get a glimpse of Sherri and what this book is all about.

What makes this book so special, is that not only does Sherri provide wonderful canning and preserving tips and recipes for every fruit and vegetable imaginable, but she also shows you how to use up your wonderful recipes in other recipes. The first recipe I chose to try from the book was the Blood Orange Marmalade. The biggest reason is, that my farmer’s market doesn’t have Blood Oranges (they don’t grow in our Missouri climate) so I buy them from the local grocer and I always buy a lot. Too much really. Usually I make smoothies and juices with them after I’ve used what I want, but this time I decided to try to make some marmalade.

First, the recipe was simple. So simple. It required three ingredients. And it’s one of those recipes, that I was able to use for other fruits and it worked just fine, which meant no more wasted fruit in my fridge. This is a good thing. Second, we went ahead and tried the recipe she paired with the Blood Orange Marmalade for using it up. It was Salmon with Orange Glaze and I have to be really honest, it was the best salmon I’ve had in a very long time. You’ll have to get the book, to get the recipe for the Salmon with Orange Glaze, but I am going to share the Blood Orange Marmalade recipe with you. I did halve the recipe, simply because I didn’t have 3lbs leftover, but I did have nearly 2 pounds and was able to use my kitchen scale to get a nice pound a half reading. This recipe will make 3 pint size jars of Blood Orange Marmalade.

Blood Orange Marmalade

This picture was after 2 weeks. I simply stirred it up and we used up this entire jar in 1 day. It was THAT good.

Blood Orange Marmalade

Blood Orange Marmalade

Blood Orange Marmalade | Put ‘Em Up! Fruit: Recipe & Giveaway

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Additional Time: 2 days
Total Time: 2 days 45 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 ½ lbs blood oranges, this was 4
  • 1 ½ cups of water
  • 3 cups of sugar

Instructions

  1. Using a vegetable brush, scrub the fruit with a nontoxic, odorless dish soap and hot water.
  2. Cut off the tops and bottoms of the oranges deeply enough to remove the solid disks of pith and reveal the flesh of the fruit. Quarter the fruit and cut away the center rib. Flick out the seeds with the end of your knife. Using the disk blade of a food processor, finely slice the orange quarters. Transfer the sliced oranges to a large nonreactive pot, looking out for any large pieces that made it past the blade. Return these larger pieces to the food processor with ½ cup of the water and puree using the chopping blade. Add the puree to the pot with enough water to cover, about another ½ cup or so. (Alternatively, you can slice the oranges thinly by hand and add them to the pot with enough water to cover, about 1 cup). Bring to a boil. Remove from heat, cover, and let sit overnight.
  3. The next day, bring to a boil and then let sit overnight again.
  4. On the third day, measure the volume of the cooled and softened mixture (you should have roughly about 3 cups), and return to the pot with an equal amount of sugar and the remaining half cup of water. Bring to a boil, stirring constantly to prevent the sugar from burning. Continue cooking until the gel stage is reached. About 20-25 minutes or so.
  5. Remove from the heat. Allow the marmalade to rest for 5 minutes, giving it an occasional gentle stir to release trapped air; it will thicken slightly. Skim off any foam.

To Can:

  1. Boil a large pot of water.
  2. Ladle the marmalade into clean, hot (submerge the into boiling water) 4-ounce or half pint jars, leaving ¼ inch of headspace between the top of the marmalade and the lid. (I was able to fill 3 jars). Run a bubble tool along the inside of the glass to release trapped air. Wipe the rims clean; center lids on the jars and screw on jar bands until they are just fingertip-tight. Process the jars by submerging them in boiling water to cover by 2 inches for 10 minutes. Turn off the heat, remove the canner lid, and let the jars rest in the water for 5 minutes. Remove the jars and set aside for 24 hours. Check the seals, then store in a cool, dark place for up to 1 year. (ours didn't last that long!)

Did you make this recipe?

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Disclosure: There are Amazon affiliate links from which I may make a commission. The giveaway prize is provided courtesy of Storey Publishing, who also provided me a review copy of the book for the purpose of this post. However, all opinions are my own and are a result of trying this recipe.

 

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CJ

Sunday 17th of November 2019

I’m curious...have you tried using honeysuckle infusion water instead of plain water for the blood orange marmalade recipe? Do you think the oranges would overpower?

Nicole Cook

Wednesday 20th of November 2019

I have not tried that, so I am not sure how it would work. It sounds delicious. If you decide to try it, let us know how it works out. Jellies, Jams and Marmalade's are such a science I'm usually afraid to do too much changing.

verhuizen zeist

Monday 11th of August 2014

I have found very useful information on how to make this marmalade and it was very good.

Nancy @ gottagetbaked

Monday 22nd of April 2013

I'm in awe of your garden, Nicole! If only I didn't live in a condo or possess the black thumb of death. And if only I wasn't terrified of bugs 'n creepy crawlies. If all of those things happened, then maaaaaybe I'd have a garden, lol. Your marmalade looks divine. It brings me back to my childhood, when my parents would buy jar upon jar of marmalade and we ate it with everything, especially buttered toast. I really need to start preserving and canning - I'll email you for some tips if I ever do!

Jennie @themessybakerblog

Monday 22nd of April 2013

Nicole, this marmalade looks amazing. I'm starting my own veggie garden this year. I'm no pro, so I'm keeping my fingers crossed. Hmm, I love preserving peaches!

Heather

Sunday 21st of April 2013

Favorite fruit to preserve is the fig!

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